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Author's Reply

Published:August 16, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jjcc.2022.07.018
      We thank Mr. Singh, a medical student in the United Kingdom, for reading our recent article [
      • Kagaya Y.
      • Tabata M.
      • Arata Y.
      • Kameoka J.
      • Ishii S.
      Feasibility and effectiveness of cardiac auscultation training with a cardiology patient simulator for first-year medical students.
      ] with great interest. We also appreciate Mr. Singh's perspective on our work on cardiac auscultation training for first-year medical students. In this study, a total of 43 first-year medical students in 2015–2019 participated in three 1.5-hour extra-curricular classes using a cardiology patient simulator and comprising mini-lectures, facilitated training, two different auscultation tests (the second test closer to clinical setting than the first), and a questionnaire. The results of the cardiac auscultation tests were compared with those of 556 fourth-year medical students who participated in a compulsory single 3-hour cardiac auscultation class in 2016–2019. We found that the accuracy rates of all heart sounds (second/third/fourth sounds) and murmurs (aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, mitral regurgitation, and mitral stenosis) and that of all heart sounds were higher in the first-year students than in the fourth-year students in both the first and second tests. The accuracy rate of murmurs was higher in the first-year students than in the fourth-year students in the first test, but not in the second test. As we described in the article and Mr. Singh mentioned in the letter, repetitive training (1.5 h × 3) of cardiac auscultation for the first-year students may have been more effective than a single 3-hour training class for the fourth-year students. However, we would like to emphasize that there are still several possible explanations for the higher accuracy rates in the auscultation tests in the first-year students than those in the fourth-year students. As described in our article, since the class for the first-year students was an extracurricular program, it is highly possible that only well motivated students, in terms of learning cardiac auscultation, may have participated in the classes. The difference in the percentage of female students between the first-year (49 %) and fourth-year (16 %) students may also have affected the results of the cardiac auscultation tests. In addition, the younger age of the first-year students, compared to the fourth-year students, may have played a role in their higher accuracy rates in the cardiac auscultation tests.

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      References

        • Kagaya Y.
        • Tabata M.
        • Arata Y.
        • Kameoka J.
        • Ishii S.
        Feasibility and effectiveness of cardiac auscultation training with a cardiology patient simulator for first-year medical students.
        J Cardiol. 2022; (In press)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jjcc.2022.06.007
        • Kagaya Y.
        • Tabata M.
        • Arata Y.
        • Kameoka J.
        • Ishii S.
        Employment of color doppler echocardiographic video clips in a cardiac auscultation class with a cardiology patient simulator: discrepancy between students' satisfaction and learning.
        BMC Med Educ. 2021; 21: 600